The Anglo-Caribbean Project

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The Project:

The late 20th Century has brought about a movement for expanded LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) rights throughout the globe. Many nations in the Americas have led this battle. In the last ten years Cuba has begun allowing gender-transition surgeries, the United States has legalized same-sex marriage and Argentine activist groups have pushed gay rights to the forefront of the domestic political agenda. However, one area of the Americas lags well behind the rest: the English-speaking Caribbean. The Anglo-Caribbean has remained stuck in a culture of seemingly unrelenting homophobia. English-speaking Caribbean nations have failed to embrace the global gay liberation movement in the same way their neighbors have. Cultures of homophobia and intolerance have prevailed throughout the Anglo-Caribbean while those same cultures have faded in neighboring states. Despite having highly democratic governments with progressive economies, the Anglo-Caribbean has remained unable to grant rights or develop cultures of acceptance for LGBTQ communities.

Therein lies the fundamental question behind this project: How have these highly democratic and economically progressed nations, surrounded by pro-LGBTQ neighbors, remained so far behind in the advancement of LGBTQ rights?


The Anglo-Caribbean Project was born from the LGBT Timeline and incorporates the data produced by the Timeline to better understand homophobia in the Anglo-Caribbean. Additionally, the Anglo-Caribbean project provides a working example of how the LGBT Timeline can inspire and contribute to larger research projects. Below you will find some of the visualization tools that emerged from the projects research.

 

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What Factors Contribute to Homophobia in the Anglo-Caribbean?
[button color=sr-button2 size=”medium-button” url=”http://lgbtdev.wordpress.amherst.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2016/05/Main-Infogram.pdf” target=”_self”]Intolerance Contributors[/button]

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How has Religion Contributed to Homophobia in the Anglo-Caribbean?

[button color=sr-button2 size=”medium-button” url=”http://lgbtdev.wordpress.amherst.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2016/05/Relion-timeline-infogram1.pdf” target=”_self”]Religion Timeline[/button]

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How Do Current Events Demonstrate Cultures of Tolerance and Intolerance?

[button color=sr-button2 size=”medium-button” url=”http://lgbtdev.wordpress.amherst.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/30/2016/05/Current-events-.pdf” target=”_self”]Exploration Map[/button]

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